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Marsden Edmund Hartley (American, 1877-1943)
Garmisch-Partenkirchen #1, 1933-34
Oil on paperboard, 17-1/2 x 29-1/2 in.
Museum Purchase: Heckscher Trust Fund.  1972.2




About This Work

The American art critic Elizabeth McCausland considered Marsden Hartley's Garmisch-Partenkirchen landscapes, executed in the Bavarian Alps, among the best works in his oeuvre. Influenced by various modernist movements since his first trip to Europe in 1912-13, Hartley achieved a singular synthesis of the structural aspects of French Cubism and the emotive power of German Expressionism in the rugged landscapes he painted in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. While they have often been described as monochromatic, the stark paintings in this series actually make use of a broader range of color, incorporating subtle pinks and blues. Their monumental power derives from Hartley's working method; during long walks he absorbed the environment, sometimes sketching on site, but painting from memory in his studio. Hartley was one of the first artists associated with the legendary gallery owner Alfred Stieglitz, who mounted many shows of European and American modernism in the early years of the 20th century.


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