A young artist poses alongside her life-sized self-portrait.


David, age 12, paints a still life with gouache.


Moira, age 10, works on her larger-than-life Pop Art sculpture.


Sara, age 8, shows off her artwork.


Cheryl, age 14, sketches with charcoal on toned paper.


A student takes a digital photograph of raked sand for a photography project inspired by the exhibition Edward Weston: Life Work.


An ArtSense student uses acrylic paints to add color to her sculpture.


Nick, age 12, uses a digital camera to take photographs for his stop motion animation film.


Sophia, age 11, proudly stands with her cityscape mixed media artwork at a student exhibition.


SummerArts students pose with their eco-friendly sculpture Bottle Man and Dog made of recycled water bottles. This independent project was inspired by the environmental art exhibition Earth Matters.


Aislin, age 10, works on a digital project using Adobe Photoshop on a Mac laptop.


During the student tours of the Museum, Naomi shows her dad a work of art in the Museum that inspired one of her art projects.


McKayla, age 12, paints a landscape with watercolors.


Summer Visual Art Workshops at The Heckscher Museum

END THE SUMMER WITH A BURST OF CREATIVITY!
Call 631.351.3250 or register in-person at the Museum Administrative Cottage, Monday - Friday, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm.

ArtSense, Ages 7-12  learn more
SummerArts, Ages 12-15  learn more

View student artwork from past Summer Visual Art Workshops
View footage from student art exhibition 2011, courtesy of MyLITV.

Summer ArtSense 2014
Ages 7 through 12
August 25 - 29


DOWNLOAD
2014 Brochure



FAQs:

1. What will my child LEARN during Summer ArtSense?

ArtSense workshops are inspired by the exhibitions on view in the Museum. Children learn art history as they explore works of art in the galleries and also learn art-making skills as they create their own artwork.

The special exhibitions and Permanent Collection exhibitions on view in the Museum often change over the course of the summer. Therefore children in one workshop may look at different artwork in the Museum from children in another. To find out what artwork will be on display during your child's session, simply go to Exhibitions.

There are always select works of art from the Museum's Permanent Collection on display in the galleries and all children learn about the history of the Museum and its continually growing Permanent Collection.

Children are introduced to the exhibitions on view and discuss concepts including:

  • Why is the exhibition titled the way it is? What does this tell us about the artwork on view?
  • What is the theme of the exhibition? What is the same about the works of art? What is different?
  • When was the artwork made? Who created it? How was it made? What techniques were used?
  • Why was the artwork made? What are the artists trying to say or express to the viewer?
Museum Educators highlight certain works of art to act as inspiration for children's artwork. Using guided questioning, Educators engage children in active group discussions. These lessons address key concepts including subject matter, style, materials used, as well as elements and principles of art. Group discussions enhance children's oral communication, critical thinking skills, and visual literacy. Each child then leads friends and family members on a tour of the Museum on the last day of the workshop, further developing these skills while also building confidence and self-esteem. All lessons meet the New York State Learning Standards for the Arts.

2. What will my child CREATE during Summer ArtSense?

No matter what exhibitions the children learn about in the Museum galleries, each workshop includes an exploration of a wide variety of materials and techniques.

This exposure to a wide range of methods is critical, particularly for the younger age groups. The materials and techniques are age appropriate for each workshop. All projects are comprehensive, often incorporating a variety of materials and techniques. Museum Educators present each project through a series of steps completed over the course of the workshop, keeping in mind the skill sets and attention spans of the age group. This approach keeps the activities for each day new and exciting while also making rather complex projects achievable for even the youngest of age groups. The number of projects completed over the course of a workshop ranges from five to seven.

Art materials and techniques children explore may include the following:
  • Printmaking (relief printing, rubbings, silk-screening)
  • Oil and chalk pastel drawing
  • Watercolor painting
  • Acrylic painting
  • Colored pencil drawing
  • Watercolor resists
  • Collage
  • Three-dimensional work with: clay, wire, Pariscraft, Model Magic, and/or found objects
  • Observational drawing
Most artwork is created in the fully equipped classrooms in Old First Church. Select projects are completed in the Museum galleries and/or en plein air in Heckscher Park. All artwork is displayed in a student exhibition for the final day of the workshop when friends and family are invited for a tour of the Museum and to see what their child has created. Children receive a Certificate of Achievement for their accomplishments during the workshop.

3. Who will TEACH my child?

A Museum Educator teaches each workshop with the assistance of approximately three interns. With a maximum enrollment of 15 children per workshop, this creates an approximate 3:1 student-to-teacher ratio, allowing for a significant amount of individualized attention.

Who are the Museum Educators?
Museum Educators are staff members of The Heckscher Museum of Art Education Department or New York State Certified Art Teachers employed by the Museum.
Joy Weiner, Director of Education and Public Programs
Joy has worked in the Education Department at the Museum since 1998. Prior to working at the Museum, she taught art in the Long Island public school system. She holds a B.F.A. in graphic design from Long Island University.

Kristina Schaaf, Associate Director of Education
Kristina has worked at the Museum since 2004. She holds a B.A. in art history and studio art from Binghamton University, an M.S. in Art Education from Queens College, and is New York State Certified in Art Education, grades K-12.

Adriana Christesen, Museum Educator

Samantha Hofsiss, Museum Educator
Who are the interns?
Interns are individuals who are studying and/or have experience in art, art history, education, and/or art education.

4. What is the Annual Heckscher Museum Student Exhibition?

ArtSense students are invited to display a work of art in the annual Heckscher Museum Student Exhibition in the Main Art Gallery at the Huntington Public Library in the fall. Students will be informed by their Museum Educator on the last day of the workshop and asked to leave the selected artwork with the Museum. Exhibiting young artists and their families and friends are invited to an opening reception at the library and are awarded a Certificate of Exhibition.

SummerArts
Ages 12 through 15
August 18 - 22


DOWNLOAD
2014 Brochure

FAQs:

1. What makes SummerArts different from other teen art programs?

SummerArts incorporates a variety of learning experiences designed for young adults interested in the visual arts. Students not only create artwork, but also view art in the Museum galleries, go behind the scenes during installations, and meet and work with exhibiting contemporary artists.

All of these experiences are integrated with their time in the studio, teaching students how to make connections between art museums, art history, and their own interests as artists in the 21st century. On the last day of class, students become docents as they teach friends and family about the artwork in the Museum before sharing what they have created during the class.

2. What will students LEARN during SummerArts?

Students not only build studio skills, but also develop

  • visual literacy
  • art appreciation
  • understanding of art historical context
  • art vocabulary
  • oral communication skills
Students learn about the exhibitions on view in the Museum. (To find out what artwork will be on display during SummerArts, simply go to Exhibitions.) Participating in related discussions and activities, students make connections between what artists have done before them and how their own artwork fits into the history of art. Key concepts from the exhibition are translated into creative prompts for students to respond to with their own work.

Participants complete additional projects designed to help provide context for their work and supplement the experience. All lessons address the elements and principles of art and are based upon professional works of art. The focus is on individualized growth over the course of the class and building upon students' prior experience and skill level.

3. What will students CREATE during SummerArts?

Extended studio time and small class size allows students to enjoy one-on-one attention and the opportunity to work in materials and techniques often unavailable in traditional, school art courses. SummerArts classes include an exploration of a wide variety of materials and techniques. Students are given the creative freedom and flexibility to determine what materials are used to complete each project.

Art materials and techniques explored may include the following:
  • Printmaking (relief printing, rubbings, silk-screening, solar printing)
  • Oil pastel, chalk pastel, charcoal and/or conte drawing
  • Watercolor and acrylic painting
  • Graphite, colored pencil drawing
  • Collage
  • Three-dimensional work with: clay, wire, and/or found objects
  • Observational drawing
Most artwork is created in the classrooms in Old First Church that are set up for studio work. Select projects are completed in the Museum galleries and/or en plein air in Heckscher Park. All artwork is displayed in a student exhibition for the final day of the workshop when friends and family are invited for a tour of the Museum and to see what students have created. All students receive a Certificate of Achievement for their accomplishments during the workshop. All lessons meet the New York State Learning Standards for the Arts.

4. Who will TEACH SummerArts classes?

A Museum Educator teaches each class with the assistance of approximately three interns. With a maximum enrollment of 15 children per class, this creates an approximate 3:1 student-to-teacher ratio, allowing for a significant amount of individualized attention.

Who are the Museum Educators?
Museum Educators are staff members of The Heckscher Museum of Art Education Department or New York State Certified Art Teachers employed by the Museum.
Joy Weiner, Director of Education and Public Programs
Joy has worked in the Education Department at the Museum since 1998. Prior to working at the Museum, she taught art in the Long Island public school system. She holds a B.F.A. in graphic design from Long Island University.

Kristina Schaaf, Associate Director of Education
Kristina has worked at the Museum since 2004. She holds a B.A. in art history and studio art from Binghamton University, an M.S. in Art Education from Queens College, and is New York State Certified in Art Education, grades K-12.

Adriana Christesen, Museum Educator

Samantha Hofsiss, Museum Educator
Who are the interns?
Interns are individuals who are studying and/or have experience in art, art history, education, and/or art education.

5. What is the Annual Heckscher Museum Student Exhibition?

All SummerArts students are invited to display a work of art in the annual Heckscher Museum Student Exhibition in the Main Art Gallery at the Huntington Public Library in the fall. Exhibiting artists and their families and friends are invited to an opening reception at the library and are awarded a Certificate of Exhibition.                         



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